Monday, April 6, 2020

Foil bits

Not a lot of progress on riding these things, but I am getting good at buying them.

supwindfoil.blogspot.com/2019/09/

The thing that I recently discovered was that a fuselage that comes with a Deep Tuttle setup has the wing further forward than a fuselage for a US Box.

This fact has me experimenting with what is the right setup for me if I stay on my knees.

Knee board foiling, anyone?

Friday, March 6, 2020

Surf Launch and Landing

Test run at Botany Bay - tiny surf and a long way to walk
Here is an edited version of a forum discussion on Seabreeze (March 2020):
https://www.seabreeze.com.au/forums/Windsurfing/Foiling/Surf-Launch-and-Landing

Some bloke from the east coast of the US said this:
I "have a long distance to traverse where the surf is powerful fully closed out white water and the water is too shallow for the foil!".

A response from someone in the mostly Australian audience was:
"Bring an anchor and float out with the board/foil, leave the sail onshore. Moor the board and go back for the sail.
Use a mechanical u-joint and euro pin". - to join the two together in the water with the least amount of fuss

To which I responded -
"The problem with your method is you have to carry an anchor on my upside-down foil board through breaking surf. This will ding the board.
Instead, next time I am going to try this:"
Then I set out the way I would do it.

Days later I got to try that method and this is what should have happened (you will have to read the forum for the problems I had):
  1. Take the anchor, rope and float out beyond the breaking waves. I walked them as far as I could, then swam a tiny bit; dropped the anchor, then carried the float as far as I could parallel to the beach until the anchor engaged.
  2. Bodysurf in and carry/swim the sail/rig out and tie it to the float.
    I had attached a fender (blue float) to the in-haul part of the boom (use a caribiner). This aids floation of the rig and should stop it from getting caught up in rips and currents.
  3. Bodysurf in and bring the board out upside-down.
    Then the tricky bit; joining the two. I found out that I have a euro pin - did not know the name of it before this.
After you have finished sailing and are on the way in, first get to the float - do not underestimate how difficult that may be.

Note that the chain goes to the other end of the anchor - there is a cable tie holding the chain to the end of the anchor - if/when the anchor jams pulling it hard will break the tie and the anchor is then pulled out backward.

Once at the float:
  1. Clip the board to the float and swim/carry the rig in, then
  2. Come back to the board - You will need the board's flotation to retrieve the anchor.
  3. Kneeling on the board pull yourself along up the rope. Don't pull the anchor all the way up to the board.
  4. Get it into shallower water (say waist deep) and leave it there,
  5. Take the board and the foil in through the surf.
  6. Then go back and get the anchor.